Diabetes in Sangamon County

Indicators

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Adults with Diabetes

9.6
11.1
Comparison: IL Counties 

7.8

percent
Measurement Period: 2007-2009

County: Sangamon

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Categories: Health / Diabetes

Recreation and Fitness Facilities

0.06
0.11
Comparison: U.S. Value 

0.11

facilities/1,000 population
Measurement Period: 2011

County: Sangamon

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Categories: Environment / Built Environment, Health / Exercise, Nutrition, & Weight

Grocery Store Density

0.20
0.15
Comparison: U.S. Counties 

0.15

stores/1,000 population
Measurement Period: 2011

County: Sangamon

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Categories: Environment / Built Environment, Health / Exercise, Nutrition, & Weight

Fast Food Restaurant Density

0.56
0.71
Comparison: U.S. Counties 

0.80

restaurants/1,000 population
Measurement Period: 2011

County: Sangamon

View Every County

Categories: Environment / Built Environment, Health / Exercise, Nutrition, & Weight

Farmers Market Density

0.03
0.01
Comparison: U.S. Value 

0.01

markets/1,000 population
Measurement Period: 2013

County: Sangamon

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Categories: Environment / Built Environment, Health / Exercise, Nutrition, & Weight

Promising Practices

Advancing Diabetes Self Management: Community Health Center, Inc.

Description

The goal of the Advancing Diabetes Self Management program at the Community Health Center was to improve the health outcomes of people with type 2 diabetes. This program targeted adults who were patients at three different health center throughout Connecticut.

During the initial session, Certified Diabetes Educators collected baseline information and clinical data, performed an assessment of diabetes knowledge, psychosocial, cultural and social factors, and administered a depression screening questionnaire. Participants who had coexisting depression were referred to a therapist.

After the first session, participants were given the choice to take part in any of the following activities: individual education sessions, group sessions, physical activity sessions, and cooking clubs. Participants were encouraged to think about behaviors, goals, and actions that they could take to improve their health outcomes. After goals were set, staff members worked to repeatedly emphasize and encourage goal attainment and maintenance over time.

For more details
http://www.chc1.com/
http://clinical.diabetesjournals.org/content/26/1/...

Advancing Diabetes Self Management: La Clinica de La Raza

Description

The goal of Advancing Diabetes Self Management (ADSM) was to improve health outcomes of low-income Latinos living in Oakland, California who suffer from type 2 diabetes.

ADSM aimed to add two new components to standard care practices: (1) community health workers (CHWs) worked one on one with patients in the clinical setting, and (2) patient-centered counseling using the transtheoretical model of change was utilized. CHWs led or assisted many activities, including support groups, one-on-one telephone counseling, diabetes classes, walking clubs, and a psychoeducational group for depression.

For more details
http://tde.sagepub.com/content/33/Supplement_6/159...

Charlotte REACH 2010

Description

Charlotte REACH 2010 addressed three health behaviors that are risk factors for diabetes and heart disease: fruit & vegetable consumption, physical activity, and cigarette smoking. The project was implemented in a predominantly African American, economically disadvantaged community in Charlotte, North Carolina. Through community involvement with a new community health center in the area, diabetes and heart disease were identified as priorities. A coalition was created that included the community health center, the county health department and other service providers. Lay health advisors were a key component of the project. These were well-trusted individuals in the community who acted as health advocates for the community. They were trained and advised by a team of health education specialists to develop programs such as walking groups, smoking cessation classes, and religion-based nutrition programs.

Several projects were aimed at creating changes in the community environment and public policy, including a farmers' market, a diabetes registry, a culturally specific mass media campaign, and communicating with political leaders on smoking cessation legislation. Randomized telephone surveys of health behaviors were conducted to assess health behaviors. An evaluation compared residents in this geographic region at baseline and five years later and also compared them with African Americans across the state.

For more details
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC250959...

Diabetes-Based Science Education for Tribal Schools (DETS)

Description

The Diabetes-Based Science Education for Tribal Schools (DETS) curriculum is a four week, K-12 curriculum that seeks to lower type 2 diabetes rates in American Indian/Alaskan Native (AI/AN) youth through a science-based diabetes/health education program that is conscious of the cultural diversity in AI/AN communities. The age-adjusted type 2 diabetes rate among AI/AN youth under 35 who used the Indian Health Service doubled between 1994 and 2004, making youth education a possible intervention to lower type 2 diabetes rates in AI/AN communities. DETS was created through a collaborative effort by three federal agencies, eight tribal colleges and universities, and seven sister sites in order to accomplish three goals: (1) educate AI/AN youth on diabetes and health, (2) instill a balanced understanding of scientific principles with respect to community values, and (3) promote science and health careers among AI/AN youth. A critical feature of the DETS curriculum is to constantly reinforce the link between the school classroom and the tribal community.

The DETS curriculum was initially implemented in fifteen geographically diverse sites in order to test its efficacy but has since been adopted by many other schools in the United States, both on and off reservations. The DETS curriculum, broken down by units and grade levels, is available for free through the DETS website. The DETS curriculum is funded by the CDC, the NIH, and the Indian Health Service.

For more details
http://www3.niddk.nih.gov/fund/other/dets/index.ht...
http://www.unlv.edu/journals/chdr/journals/JHDRP-V...

Every Little Step Counts

Description

"Every Little Step Counts" was an effort to create a culturally appropriate healthy lifestyle education program for Latino children at highest risk for type 2 diabetes in the Phoenix, Arizona area. Participants were referred to the clinic from local school nurses. They were required to have a BMI in the 95th percentile or higher and also had to meet other criteria based on the American Diabetes Association's screening recommendations for type 2 diabetes in youth. Before enrolling in the program, laboratory testing for insulin resistance and cholesterol levels was performed. The initial appointment included a discussion of medical history and a physical exam.

Following the exam, children and their parents attended culturally appropriate healthy lifestyle education classes that dealt with issues such as the connection between weight, health, nutrition, and diabetes, roles and responsibilities of the children and their families around communication and health, education about and encouragement of physical activity, self-esteem and self-efficacy for making healthy decisions, and developing an individual healthy behavior plan and strategies for behavior change. Approximately three months after the end of the classes, participants returned for a one-on-one appointment with a dietician where challenges in maintaining behavior change were discussed. Children continued with follow-up sessions on problem solving, dietary adjustments, and other counseling.

For more details
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC306884...

Let's Beat Diabetes (LBD)

Description

The goal of Let's Beat Diabetes (LBD) is to prevent or delay the onset of diabetes, slow the progression of the disease, and increase quality of life for those living with diabetes in Counties Manukau, New Zealand. LBD believes that the whole society, whole life course, and whole family must be considered when battling diabetes.

LBD has 10 distinct action areas, one of which is to support primary care based prevention and early intervention. In order to satisfy this action area, facilitators were recruited by primary health organizations in Counties Manukau. These facilitators then delivered a 6-week self-management education program to a group of patients with diabetes.

For more details
http://www.cdc.gov/pcd/issues/2011/mar/09_0207.htm
http://www.cmdhb.org.nz/about_cmdhb/planning/healt...

Medical Nutrition Therapy Program

Description

Medical Nutrition Therapy (MNT) is a nutrition and education program for pregnant women with diabetes. A high prevalence of diabetes in pregnancy is associated with a high rate of maternal and neonatal hospitalizations related to diabetes. The MNT program consists of individual nutrition counseling with an intensive education component. The program includes a nutrition assessment, nutrition intervention, and glucose self-monitoring. Counseling and individual nutrition assessments and recommendations are made by dietitians who work with the pregnant women on a weekly basis.

For more details
http://tde.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/35/6/1004

National Diabetes Prevention Program

Description

The National Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) is a lifestyle change program for preventing type 2 diabetes among individuals who are prediabetic (impaired glucose tolerance). The program teaches participants strategies for incorporating physical activity into daily life and eating healthy. Through a 16-course curriculum, lifestyle coaches help participants identify emotions and situations that can sabotage their success.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention funds the program through six organizations in order to reach the most people who are at high risk for diabetes, including: The American Association for Diabetes Educators, America's Health Insurance Plans, Black Women's Health Imperative, National Association of Chronic Disease Directors, OptumHealth Care Solutions, and YMCA of the USA. Funded organizations will offer the program, provide information to employers about offering the program, and work with third-party payers to facilitate performance-based reimbursement directly to organization delivering the lifestyle change program.

The program also maintains a registry of programs that are recognized for effective delivery of lifestyle change intervention programs to prevent type 2 diabetes.

For more details
http://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/prevention/index.htm
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23544761

Northern Michigan Diabetes Initiative: Provider Education Program

Description

The Provider Education Program of the Northern Michigan Diabetes Initiative (NMDI) consists of two main components: the Educational Outreach Visit program and the web-based iDose application. The Educational Outreach Visit program educates providers on diabetes management through a curriculum based on ADA guidelines and developed by endocrinologist Dr. Jill Vollbrecht. Dr. Vollbrecht reviews the curriculum with primary care providers to increase their knowledge of diabetes management and improve glycemic and lipid control among patients with diabetes.

iDose, also developed by Dr. Vollbrecht, is an online resource for healthcare providers managing diabetes in their patients. Providers are prompted to enter relevant patient information and the tool calculates individualized insulin doses, thereby eliminating the need for manual calculation using two complex formulas.

For more details
http://www.nmdiabetes.org

Pasos Adelante

Description

Pasos Adelante is a chronic disease prevention program for Mexican-Americans residing in U.S.-Mexico border communities. This initiative uses community health workers, called promotores, to recruit participants and run culturally tailored 12-week interventions consisting of weekly scripted classroom sessions and walking groups. The program uniquely motivates Mexican-Americans to adopt healthy behaviors by educating them on nutrition and providing a supportive environment to walk. This initiative has been implemented on two separate occasions, first from 2000 to 2003 in Yuma and Santa Cruz counties of Arizona, second from 2005 to 2008 in Douglas, Arizona, by University of Arizona and community health organizations. Pasos Adelante was funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Prevention Research Center.

For more details
http://www.cdc.gov/prc/prevention-strategies/chron...
http://www.cdc.gov/pcd/issues/2012/10_0301.htm

Funding Opportunities

The colored gauge gives a visual representation of how your community is doing in comparison to other communities. The three-colored dial represents the distribution of values from the reporting regions (e.g. counties in the state) ordered from those doing the best to those doing the worst (sometimes lower values are better and in other cases higher values are better). From that distribution, the green represents the top 50th percentile, the yellow represents the 25th to 50th percentile, and the red represents the "worst" quartile.


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